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Frequently Asked Questions

How do I sign up for my mandatory advising session?

Students can sign up for mandatory and voluntary advising appointments online via this link. Students should follow the prompts and fill in the appropriate fields to successfully schedule an appointment. Once signed up, the student will receive an email confirming his/her scheduled appointment.

 

Where is the Office of Undergraduate Advising in the School of Architecture?

The Office of Undergraduate Advising is located within the main office on the second floor. When you arrive, the receptionist will be able to guide you back to our office.

 

How do I declare a minor?

You can find a full list of minors on campus in the Undergraduate Catalog's Minors section. You will need to see the department in charge of each minor you are interested in to declare the minor. The School of Architecture currently has two minors, Construction Project Management and Real Estate Development Minor, but there are over 90 minors across campus to choose from as well.

 

How can I get permission to take classes at another institution?

Simply schedule an appointment with the Director of Student Services and request a Permission to Enroll (PTE) form. The advisors will go through which courses will transfer from other institutions and ensure you can receive credit. Typically, courses are taken during the summer or winter terms.

 

Can I take a course Pass/Fail?

Students should refer to the Pass/Fail Policy in the Undergraduate Catalog.

 

Can an undergraduate student take a graduate level class?

Students, usually junior or senior standing and who meet certain criteria, are eligible to take graduate level courses. Students first need to obtain permission from the instructor offering the graduate level class. Then students must obtain an approval from the Director of Student Services. 

 

How many times can I repeat a course?

Students who need to repeat the course for their major for the third time must obtain an approval from the department. Permission for the third repeat is not automatically granted; students should be prepared to discuss why they seek an exception and their preparedness for doing so.

 

I’m interested in graduate school. Who can I speak with to learn more?

Contact Dana Kobrin at arch-admissions@umd.edu to learn more and schedule an appointment. 

 

Where do students live?

While currently there is no on-campus graduate housing at the University of Maryland, there are two all-graduate student housing options in close proximity to campus: Graduate Hills and Graduate Gardens. They are located on university property, but are managed by the private company, Southern Management Corporation. Many students choose to live in apartments closer to Washington or Baltimore and commute to campus.

Architecture

How do I know if architecture is right for me?

If you are interested in getting a better sense of our program and the profession, consider joining us in a three-week summer program for high school students, Discovering Architecture. This is a very cost-effective way to determine if architecture is the right career for you prior to enrolling in college. Discovering Architecture also provides students with three -credit hours that can be applied to their undergraduate education

What is the difference between a Bachelor of Science in Architecture (BS in ARCH), a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture (BA in ARCH), and a Bachelor of Architecture (B ARCH) degree?

The Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degrees are pre-professional degrees (like pre-law or pre-med), however when these degrees are combined with an accredited professional degree (usually the Master of Architecture degree) the degree combinations offer the recipient credentials for professional registration. The Bachelor of Architecture degree (usually a five-year degree track) is a professional degree offered at the undergraduate level.

Which is the better degree, the Bachelor of Science in Architecture or the Bachelor of Arts in Architecture?

The answer is neither. The question should be, “which is the better degree track for me?” Both degrees offer unique opportunities. Both degrees permit individuals to gain the experience needed to realize careers in architecture and a wide variety of other disciplines. The BS in Architecture offers an accelerated path to the professional degree, while the BA in Architecture offers more opportunities for tailoring a course of study that fits your personal interests and talents.

What’s an accredited degree and why is it important?

In the United States, most registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit professional degree programs in architecture offered by institutions with U.S. regional accreditation, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted an eight-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards. Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may require a pre-professional undergraduate degree in architecture for admission. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

Why don’t you offer a five-year Bachelor of Architecture degree at the University of Maryland?

The University of Maryland did offer a Bachelor of Architecture degree until the mid-1980’s when it transitioned to the Bachelor of Science in Architecture (4-year degree) plus the Master of Architecture (2-year degree). The most prestigious schools nationally have structured their curricula paralleling that of the law and medical professions such that students are afforded a pre-professional experience at the undergraduate level and an intensive professional degree-track at the graduate level. Our program, which is commonly referred to as a 4+2 program (referring to the typical number of years studying at the undergraduate and graduate levels respectively), was developed in response to the nation-wide trend to associate graduate study and professional education. The Bachelor of Architecture degree was developed in the 19th Century as an attempt to integrate the vocational training of architects within the structure of American universities.  In the late-1960s, the “Princeton Report” and other factors in higher education suggested that the future of professional education in architecture did not reside in the nearly 100-year old Bachelor of Architecture model and was better served by a combination of undergraduate pre-professional and graduate professional education. Other benefits of the 4+2 model are:

  • Students in our pre-professional baccalaureate programs can make adjustments or changes to their undergraduate major more readily than they might in a Bachelor of Architecture program.

  • Students benefit from more coursework and electives outside of architecture that better prepares them to be leaders of a complex and dynamic design profession.

  • Students can take time off between their undergraduate coursework and graduate coursework in order to gain practical experience in an office setting as an intern.

  • Students in a pre-professional education are generally more integrated into collegiate life than their counterparts who receive professional degrees at the undergraduate level.

  • Undergraduates may elect to pursue graduate education at an institution other than Maryland.

  • The architecture program controls significant resources to financially support graduate education through scholarships and assistantships.

Is a professional degree from a NAAB-accredited program required to satisfy a state board of architects' education requirement?

The answer is complicated. Most jurisdictions in the United States require an accredited professional degree as a precondition for professional registration. Several jurisdictions do not have this requirement and will permit individuals who have worked for a predetermined number of years to become a registered architect after completing the Architect Registration Examination and other board requirements. The problem is, your state registration in this case may not be transportable. That is, if you are registered in Jurisdiction A, which does not have a professional degree requirement, and you want to seek reciprocity in nearby Jurisdiction B, which does have a professional degree requirement, you may not be able to practice in Jurisdiction B because you do not have a professional degree. This may hamper your path toward leadership in your firm and it may also limit your ability to compete for work out of state. For more information, explore (www.ncarb.org).

Will I be able to become an architect with a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in Architecture?

Since our undergraduate programs are considered pre-professional architecture degrees, students holding this degree will have to complete a professional degree before being able to sit for the Architect Registration Exam (ARE). Many students continue in our professionally accredited Master of Architecture program or elect to pursue graduate studies at another institution.

What if I am not sure about my major? I like architecture, but what if I enroll in the architecture program and I change my mind?

About 80 percent of students in the United States end up changing their major at least once, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. On average, college students change their major at least three times over the course of their college career. - Yuritzy Ramos, Borderzine, March 2013

Our program is structured in such a way to allow you greater flexibility in deciding on your major, because changing majors in a traditional five-year Bachelor of Architecture program can be a challenge, cost you money, and lose time toward your degree.

What is studio?

Design studio is an intensive teaching-learning environment that involves hands-on learning.  It is an integrated experience where students learn not only from faculty members, but also from their peers.  Students analyze and propose innovative solutions to contemporary problems using a variety of media (hand drawing, physical modeling, and digital media). The studio environment encourages integration of knowledge gleaned from other courses taken throughout the curriculum and encourages students to work collaboratively and individually based on a “learning by doing” educational ethic.

As an architecture student, will I be able to declare a dual major?

Yes. Many architecture students hold another major to supplement their education. Since architecture is very demanding in terms of time and workload, it is difficult to major in other time-consuming disciplines such as engineering or business. Students often pick up additional majors in world languages and cultures as well as the arts because of their flexible major paths. The Bachelor of Arts degree provides much more flexibility for a dual major than the Bachelor of Science. It is wise to meet with an advisor to discuss your options before speaking with other departments.

I want to study abroad; Can I take architecture courses overseas?

Yes. The School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation recognizes that architecture is meant to be experienced and studied beyond College Park. The School offers a full semester program in Florence during junior year, three- to six-week-long programs in both the winter and summer terms, and a semester-long studio course in the third year, in addition to many other programs offered by the university. For a current list of all our study abroad programs, please visit: http://globalmaryland.umd.edu/.

Applying

Do I need a portfolio if I am applying as a freshman or a transfer student?

No, the University of Maryland does not require a portfolio for prospective first-year students or transfer students. Portfolio submissions are optional; it is more useful upon acceptance to determine your strengths in the program, but not required.

Will I get credit for my AP, IB and CLEP Scores?

Maryland will give credit for many different AP, IB and CLEP tests and scores. Generally, you must earn a minimum score on a test to receive credit. You can find a complete list of the tests and credits here: http://www.transfercredit.umd.edu/plc.html.

I am applying to the graduate program. What do I put in my portfolio?  Do I need to take college level drawing, painting, or digital media courses to be considered for admission?

Your portfolio represents your personal creative potential and ability to represent ideas graphically.  College-level drawing courses are not required, but if you haven’t picked up a pencil, charcoal, or a brush for some time now it might be a good idea to enroll in a structured drawing course. If you have never studied architecture at the undergraduate level, you do not need to demonstrate work in digital media. Once admitted, we will provide you with instruction that improves your manual drawing and digital media skills. For more information see the portfolio requirements in the Admission section.

I am already a student at the University of Maryland. How do I become an architecture student?

Any student who is interested in architecture can become an architecture major, although we strongly encourage you to take at least one architecture class before declaring. For more information on the process and to obtain the “Declaration of Major” form, please contact the Office of Undergraduate Advising above or make an undergraduate admissions appointment here.

When I was in college I never studied architecture, but I have always had a strong interest in the profession. To this day, I fashion myself as a would-be architect. I am now working as an assistant to the traveling secretary for a major league franchise. Is there any hope for me becoming an architect?

Wait a minute! You are either George Costanza,* or you are living a parallel existence. But wait, there is indeed hope for you!  We offer a seven-semester program for individuals who hold a baccalaureate in a field other than architecture. We’ve had lawyers, accountants, even marine biologists and NASA scientists change careers and join us to study architecture.

* George Costanza (played by Jason Alexander) was a character in the long-running sitcom Seinfeld.  In several episodes Costanza either fancied himself as an architect or tried to pass himself off as one.  By the way, it is illegal in many jurisdictions to call yourself “architect” if you are not licensed.

Newly Accepted Students

What is studio?

Design studio is an intensive teaching-learning environment that involves hands-on learning.  It is an integrated experience where students learn not only from faculty members, but also from their peers.  Students analyze and propose innovative solutions to contemporary problems using a variety of media (hand drawing, physical modeling, and digital media). The studio environment encourages integration of knowledge gleaned from other courses taken throughout the curriculum and encourages students to work collaboratively and individually based on a “learning by doing” educational ethic.

When will I take studio courses?

The first studio course takes place second semester of sophomore year. Your studio schedule will vary whether you are a B.S. or B.A. track student. Prior to beginning studio, each student will be assigned a desk in the great space. The studio culture is a lively, collaborative and supportive environment for our students and a highlight of our program.

Do I come in as a B.A. or a B.S. in architecture student?

Everybody automatically comes in as a B.A. student. If a student is interested in pursuing a B.S. in architecture, they can apply during their sophomore year. All applicants are subject to a review process. For more details, speak with your advisor or the program director.

How can I get involved in extracurricular activities, student groups and clubs?

There are hundreds of student organizations, social groups, and extracurriculars at the University of Maryland. Each fall, the university hosts a First Look Fair to introduce new students to these opportunities. For architecture students, we offer architecture-specific organizations tailored to a variety of interests, including community-focused groups, diversity, and nationally-affiliated chapters.

I am a graduate student. How do I get a graduate assistantship?

When you complete your graduate admissions application you are also invited to apply for graduate assistantships and financial aid.

How do I find internships, get help with my portfolio or resume?

Our career services advisor, Kristen Tepper is available to help our students find jobs and put their best foot forward in the professional world. For appointments, visit: https://booknow.appointment-plus.com/73x1re90/. We also hold a career fair each spring that connects our students to dozens of area firms, companies and agencies.

What sort of services do you offer students to help them navigate the complexities of college life?

While academic counseling is an important duty of our advising team, equally important is the health and wellness of our students as they begin this new chapter. Appointments are available here: https://booknow.appointment-plus.com/73x1re90/.

FAQs for Undergraduate Students with Architecture Majors

What is a registration block and how do I lift this block on my registration?

A block is a hold placed on student records to prevent registration. Each semester, students are expected to log on to Testudo and check their registration time and blocks. It is the student’s responsibility to take appropriate actions to remove those blocks in order to register on time.

Every semester, students will have a mandatory advising block on their registration. It is important that students meet with an advisor before their designated registration date. Once you have met with an advisor, they will lift the mandatory advising block that prevents you from registering. If you do not meet with your advisor, this block will not be removed and you will NOT be able to register. Since space in some classes can be competitive, it is in your best interests to get cleared of ALL blocks well in advance of your registration date.

How do I sign up for my mandatory advising session?

Students can sign up for mandatory and voluntary advising appointments online via this link. Students should follow the prompts and fill in the appropriate fields to successfully schedule an appointment. Once signed up, the student will receive an email confirming his/her scheduled appointment.

Where is the Office of Undergraduate Advising in the School of Architecture?

The Office of Undergraduate Advising is located within the main office on the second floor. When you arrive, the receptionist will be able to guide you back to our office.

How do I declare a minor?

You can find a full list of minors on campus in the Undergraduate Catalog's Minors section. You will need to see the department in charge of each minor you are interested in to declare the minor. The School of Architecture currently has two minors, Construction Project Management and Real Estate Development Minor, but there are over 90 minors across campus to choose from as well.

How can I get permission to take classes at another institution?

Simply schedule an appointment with the Director of Student Services and request a Permission to Enroll (PTE) form. The advisors will go through which courses will transfer from other institutions and ensure you can receive credit. Typically, courses are taken during the summer or winter terms.

Can I take a course Pass/Fail?

Students should refer to the Pass/Fail Policy in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Can an undergraduate student take a graduate level class?

Students, usually junior or senior standing and who meet certain criteria, are eligible to take graduate level courses. Students first need to obtain permission from the instructor offering the graduate level class. Then students must obtain an approval from the Director of Student Services.

How many times can I repeat a course?

Students who need to repeat the course for their major for the third time must obtain an approval from the department. Permission for the third repeat is not automatically granted; students should be prepared to discuss why they seek an exception and their preparedness for doing so.

International and Transfer Students

Where can I get more information on Graduate and Undergraduate Admissions for International Students?

Graduate Admissions: https://www.gradschool.umd.edu/admissions/international-admissions

Undergraduate Admissions: https://admissions.umd.edu/apply/admission-requirements/international-applicant-requirements


 

What score on the TOEFL/IELTS do I need for this university?

You will be required to submit TOEFL, IELTS or PTE scores if you do not hold a degree from a U.S. institution or from one of the English speaking countries (below).  If you are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident with international credentials, you will still be required to submit English test scores if you do not hold a degree from one of the countries on this list.

 

Options for providing evidence of English proficiency include:

  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Score
    For the University of Maryland to receive your TOEFL score, please use the reporting code 5814.

  • Pearson (PTE) Score
    PTE test takers can send their score reports to the University of Maryland through their Pearson Account.

  • International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Score

The University of Maryland downloads IELTS scores that have been transmitted to our e-download account.  IELTS test takers should contact their IELTS test center directly to request electronic test scores be sent to the following IELTS e-download account:

 

University of Maryland - The Graduate School
The Graduate School
2123 Lee Building
College Park, Maryland, 20742

 

Please note: The Graduate School will not accept paper IELTS test report forms.

If your TOEFL/IELTS/PTE score falls within the range for conditional enrollment, the Graduate School may admit you with an English language condition. If so, you will be notified of this requirement in your official admission letter issued by the Graduate School.

New iBT TOEFL requirements will take effect starting with Fall 2020 admissions (see chart below). No change will be made to the IELTS and PTE requirements. Beginning in August 2019, we will accept iBT TOEFL Superscores from ETS for purposes of meeting iBT TOEFL subscore requirements. If more than one valid IELTS or PTE score is submitted we will also consider the highest sectional scores from across all exams when determining whether requirements for full enrollment have been met. Please note that superscoring can only be done with the same types of test. For example, we will not superscore between an IELTS and a TOEFL exam.

For more information, see the Graduate School Website.
 

 

What visa do I need to attend the University of Maryland, College Park?

See the following link for more information about applying for a student visa. For more questions and information, contact International Student and Scholar Services

Urban Studies & Planning

What sort of background do I need?

All applicants must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. There is no restriction on the applicant's previous field of study and our students enter the program with a variety of previous experiences.

 

What are the admission requirements? Do I need to take the GRE?

Students are evaluated on a comprehensive basis that takes into account a variety of factors. However, if you carried a 3.5 GPA or higher in your undergraduate degree, you can choose not to submit GRE scores. We ask students to provide a statement of purpose, resume, transcripts, letters of recommendation, and GRE scores, where applicable.

 

Why Urban Planning at Maryland?

The Urban Studies and Planning Program at the University of Maryland is located in College Park, Md., an ideal place to study city and regional planning. We are with easy access of the industrial city of Baltimore, the nation's capital of Washington, D.C., and the state capital, historic Annapolis. We are also in close proximity to such well-known planned communities as Greenbelt, Md., Columbia, Md., and Reston, Va., along with several highly-regarded examples of new urbanism such as Kentlands and King Farm (both in Maryland).

The Urban Studies and Planning Program brings together an active community of scholars and students to creatively confront the issues facing our cities and metropolitan regions. Through instruction, participation in research, and community interaction, students explore the changing character and critical problems of modern urban development. The curriculum emphasizes student understanding of the political, economic, institutional, and social context within which planners work with a diverse range of stakeholders to develop and implement plans, policies, and programs. Students may specialize in housing and community development, economic development, environmental planning, and transportation planning.

The program offers several dual degree options for students interested in increasing their knowledge base within the built environment, including architecture, historic preservation, law, landscape architecture and real estate development.

 

How long is the course of study for the Urban Planning Program?

Students may pursue their master’s degree on a full or part-time basis. Full-time students are able to finish in two years. Part-time students can complete at their own pace up to five years. Full-time dual degree students in Community Planning and a second discipline can take.

 

What is the capstone of the community planning program?

The student capstone in the community planning program is two-fold. First, students are required to complete an internship relevant to their course of study. Second, students are required to engage in a 6-credit studio course centered on a community-based project. Students do have an option to write a final paper for thesis research credit.  

 

How many hours is the master's degree?

The MCP is a 48-hour degree program.

 

Do I get hands-on training?

Yes! Students engage in real-world urban planning challenges through their internship. Students also have the opportunity to work with local communities and stakeholders through the studio course and many of the other courses that are part of the program, as well as through competitions. One of the hallmarks of the program is its deep involvement with the Partnership for Action Learning in Sustainability, one of the largest active learning programs in the country, which pairs students and faculty with planning challenges throughout the state.

 

What types of financial aid or scholarships are available?

The Urban Planning Program provides graduate assistantship opportunities each semester, each of which provides tuition remission and a stipend in return for 10-hour or 20-hour per week work assignments. In addition, students who receive a graduate assistantship with the program receive an internship their second year with a state agency.

 

Are there jobs in Urban Planning?

Virtually every aspect of the built environment is shaped by urban planning. Our alumni go on to work in federal, state, and local government, non-profit, private firms and organizations. We boast a 95% placement rate of students prior to graduation.

Historic Preservation

What sort of background do I need?

All applicants must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. There is no restriction on the applicant's previous field of study and our students enter the program with a variety of previous experiences.

 

What are the admission requirements? Do I need to take the GRE?

Students are evaluated on a comprehensive basis that takes into account a variety of factors. This is why we ask students to provide a statement of purpose, resume, transcripts, letters of recommendation, and GRE scores. An applicant’s GRE score is weighed alongside other factors and, as a result, there is no minimum required score.

 

Why Preservation at Maryland?

The Historic Preservation Program draws on multiple disciplines, perspectives and practices to prepare you for a career preserving our nation’s tangible and intangible heritage and finding inspired uses for these resources in today’s world. 

With so many preservation organizations and agencies—local, state and federal—in the metropolitan D.C. region, you’ll learn from well-connected faculty and challenging internships that will allow you to expand and apply your knowledge and skills. Plus, you’ll find two great urban laboratories in Baltimore and Washington; places and spaces where you can explore gentrification, sustainability and other pressing issues; and a broad cultural landscape, from the Atlantic coast to the mountains of Appalachia.

The Historic Preservation program also offers five dual-degree options for students looking to explore historic preservation in conjunction with architecture, real estate development, community planning, applied anthropology, or history. The dual degrees, four of which can be completed with just one extra semester of study, allow students to build knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in an increasingly competitive and changing global market. 

 

How long is the course of study for the Historic Preservation Programs?

Students may pursue their master’s degree on a full or part-time basis. Full-time students are able to finish in two years. Full-time dual degree students in Historic Preservation and Community Planning, Real Estate Development, or Applied Anthropology can finish in two-and-a-half years. The dual degree with Architecture takes three or four years depending upon the applicant’s background in architecture.

 

What are the foci of the Preservation curriculum?

The core of the program focuses on the basics of history, theory, and practice including history and theory, law, materials conservation, research methods, architectural history and documentation. In addition, course work includes policy, planning, economics, management and practice. The Social and Ethnic Issues of Preservation course, a unique component of the UMD program, teaches students to understand the broader social impacts of preservation in a multicultural society. Each student must complete 36 credits of required course work. Students may focus the remaining 9 credits in elective coursework specific to their area of interest. 

 

What does the final graduate project for master's students entail?

HISP students complete a Final Project rather than a traditional thesis. This project enables students to complete a product that correlates with the professional nature of typical Historic Preservation practice. The first semester final project course develops a research project proposal and literature review. The second semester final project course focuses on independent research, writing, and group seminars working toward the final presentation and defense of student’s final project document. Selection of the final project is determined in coordination with your advisors.

 

How many hours is the master's degree?

The MHP s a 45-hour degree program.

 

Do I get hands-on training?

Virtually every class, from the introductory course to the final project, gets you out in the field and connects you to preservation issues and practice in communities and neighborhoods. You may be pressing your case on Capitol Hill as part of National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, attending a local historic district commission meeting for your law class or visiting one of hundreds of historic properties to start a project in your historical research methods or vernacular architecture class. 

You can combine your coursework with invaluable research and field-based professional training in documentation, policy and interpretation. With our partners, such as the National Park Service, Maryland Historical Trust and local, county and city agencies, we provide unique ways to get experience in decision-making, management and conservation. 

Here’s just a sample:

  • Bostwick House: This 18th-century house and its 10-acre property in nearby Bladensburg, Md., provide a living classroom for the program. 

  • Studio Classes in Historic Neighborhoods: Using site analysis, historical research, geographic information system (gis) mapping and community outreach, teams of students have developed recommendations interweaving historical tradition and legacies with future needs in neighborhoods such as Old Goucher in Baltimore and the H Street Corridor and Georgia Avenue in D.C., as well as in nearby Hyattsville and Bladensburg. 

What types of financial aid or scholarships are available?

Students at the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation finance their education through a wide variety of options. The University of Maryland Office of Student Financial Aid assists students in obtaining need-based aid. The Historic Preservation program provides a competitive amount of graduate assistantships each semester, each of which provides tuition remission and a stipend in return for 10-hour or 20-hour per week work assignments. Additionally, the Historic Preservation program provides a number of smaller scholarships on an annual basis.

 

Are there jobs in Historic Preservation?

Yes! 85% of students have a job in historic preservation within one year of graduation. Alumni go on to work in government, cultural resource management, architecture firms, museums, nonprofit agencies and historic sites. Many students go on to work for the same organizations they interned at. 

 

What types of job opportunities are available for Preservation students on and off campus?

Historic preservation students are eligible for various office, research, and teaching assistantships. Additionally, all students complete a non-credit internship. Our 180+ graduates have interned at more than 80 different organizations, including The National Trust, National Park Service, US/ICOMOS, and preservation offices at the local, county, and statewide level. Many students pursue part-time work opportunities at local museums or non-profit organizations near campus.

Real Estate Development

What sort of background do I need for the master’s degree?

All applicants must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. There is no restriction on the applicant's previous field of study and our students enter the program with a variety of previous experiences.

 

What are the admission requirements for the master’s degree? Do I need to take the GRE or GMAT?

Students are evaluated comprehensively on a variety of factors. This is why we ask students to provide a statement of purpose, resume, transcripts, letters of recommendation, and GRE/GMAT scores. An applicant’s GRE/GMAT score is weighed alongside other factors and, as a result, there is no minimum required score. If you have completed your undergraduate degree less than five years ago, then you are required to take the GRE/GMAT, however, if you have a master’s degree, you do not need to take the GRE/GMAT. 

 

Why MRED at Maryland?

The Master of Real Estate Development degree (MRED) at Maryland embraces a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary approach to real estate education addressing all facets of the industry from planning to property management, finance to construction. We educate our real estate students to develop beyond the constructs of the traditional financial “bottom line,” but rather, for a “Quadruple Bottom Line,” one more broadly centered on Economic Viability, Environmental Respect, Social Responsibility and Beautiful Design.

Besides undertaking the work in your courses, you will find multiple opportunities to interact with industry professionals, many of whom will come to lecture in your classes or work with you on your capstone project. Our location in the Baltimore-Washington area, one of the most diverse and rapidly-growing areas of the country, will offer you endless opportunities to interact and connect with an active real estate environment. In addition, we encourage early and frequent involvement with one of the many development trade associations located in this region.

 

How long is the course of study for the MRED Program?

Students may pursue their master’s degree on a full or part-time basis. Maryland’s program is flexible and customizable; many of our students are working professionals pursuing their degree part time, so we offer an environment where students can go at their own pace. Full-time students are able to finish in about two years. Full-time dual degree students in real estate development, architecture, community planning, historic preservation and business administration can finish in three-and-a-half years. 

 

What is the admissions cycle? 

The program offers rolling admissions, allowing students to start in the fall or spring. 

 

What are the foci of the MRED curriculum?

The core of the program focuses on the basics of history, theory, and practice, including history and theory, law, materials conservation, research methods, architectural history, and documentation. In addition, coursework includes policy, planning, economics, management, and practice. The Social and Ethnic Issues of Preservation course, a unique component of the UMD program, teaches students to understand the broader social impacts of preservation in a multicultural society. Each student must complete 36 credits of required coursework. Students may focus the remaining 9 credits in elective coursework specific to their area of interest. 

 

What does the final graduate project for MRED entail?

The Master of Real Estate Development culminates with the  capstone project, where students produce a real-world, full-blown feasibility study of a development property. Presented to a jury of industry professionals at semester’s end, the capstone demonstrates a student’s ability to successfully communicate with the many players at the table of a successful real estate project--planners, policymakers, community stakeholders, architects, asset managers, financiers, and more. 

 

How many hours is the master's degree?

The MRED is 33-42 credit hours, depending on the student’s educational background. 

 

What types of financial aid or scholarships are available?

Students at the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation finance their education through a wide variety of options. The University of Maryland Office of Student Financial Aid assists students in obtaining need-based aid. The MRED program provides a competitive amount of graduate assistantships each semester. Learn more about those opportunities here. 

 

What kind of jobs can I expect after graduating?

In a sense, the MRED program is multi-disciplinary; it prepares students for a variety of careers in the real estate development industry, including development, project management, real estate consulting and finance. It’s position in the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation offers a number of interdisciplinary opportunities across the school, preparing students to work closely with designers, urban planners and preservationists in professional practice.

 

What’s the demographic makeup of the MRED program? 

Our students are typically working professionals who have spent some time in the workforce; the median age of an MRED student is 33. Our students come from Maryland (57%) but also from all over the world (22% of our students are international students). Other statistics include 37% ethnic minority and 36% female. 

 

What are the requirements for the MRED certificate program? 

The Real Estate Development Program offers a 12-21 credit graduate certificate of professional studies in real estate development. The certificate program has the same requirements for admission as the master’s program. Students without real estate development and finance education or experience typically take 2-3 introductory courses in finance, development, and tax and accounting principles, process and practice. After these courses are completed, the certificate has two required courses: Development Law and Fundamental of Finance and Investments, plus two additional courses selected from cognate areas in design, construction, asset management, market analysis/valuation and planning/entitlements.

 

If I enroll in the certificate program and decide I want to pursue a master’s degree, do I have to start over? 

No. If you start out with a certificate and decide you want to pursue a masters, you can apply the credits. 

 

When are classes held? 

Classes are held in the evenings at the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation to accommodate many of our working professional students. 

 

What opportunities are available outside of the classroom?

The school’s signature active learning program, the Partnership for Action Learning in Sustainability, gives students the opportunity to work with communities in Maryland on real-world projects related to issues of sustainable development and redevelopment. Through the Colvin Institute of Real Estate Development, students are afforded opportunities to participate in competitions, including the ULI Student Design Competition and the HUD Affordable Housing competition, as well as attend conferences and networking events. 

 

What is the Colvin Institute of Real Estate Development?

Founded by Baltimore developer and UMD alum John Colvin and his wife Karen, the Colvin Institute provides student enhancement for the master’s program, including regular guest speakers and opportunities to attend conferences and competitions. Learn more by visiting the Colvin website

 

I’m interested in minoring in real estate development. Where can I learn more? 

Undergraduates with an interest in real estate can now complete a minor in real estate development. The minor provides students with an overview of sustainable real estate development, including the development process, the basics of real estate finance, urban planning and design, and the unique roles of government and the private sector. 

The minor is particularly suited to students with an interest in careers related to real estate and the built environment, such as architecture, business, construction management, civil engineering, historic preservation, local government, non-profit housing, public-private partnerships, landscape architecture, urban planning, or related entrepreneurial ventures. 

Students should consult with their undergraduate advisor to develop a plan for completing a minor. To learn more, visit the minor in real estate development page.

PhD - Urban and Regional Planning and Design

Why PhD at Maryland?

The PhD in Urban Planning and Design at the University of Maryland prepares students to teach at the University level in departments of urban planning, architecture, historic preservation, landscape architecture, or real estate development and will qualify graduates to conduct research and participate in high level decision making in the public, private, and non-profit sectors. Located in the heart of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Region, Maryland’s PhD program offers a number of opportunities to explore topics related to applied and theoretical urban planning and design research. The program is closely connected with the university’s National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education, which undertakes a broad range of research in economic growth and development, redevelopment, housing, transportation and land use planning, environmental preservation, and smart growth issues; the University of Maryland-Morgan State University U.S. Department of Economic Development Administration University Center; and the Environmental Finance Center, one of nine EPA-funded centers in the country, which works with communities to finance green infrastructure, preservation efforts and stormwater utilities. These centers support and nurture the pursuits of our doctoral students.

 

What are the requirements for Admission?

The program is highly selective and individualized. Approximately five students will be admitted each year. Students admitted to the PhD program will be expected to have completed a Master's degree in a related field including but not exclusively urban planning, architecture, historic preservation or landscape architecture. Students are expected to enter the PhD program with two semesters of graduate level quantitative research methods. These courses can be taken after entrance to the program and prior to their advanced methods course. 

 

How is the program structured? How long does it take to complete a PhD?

The PhD program in Urban and Regional Planning and Design is a 39-credit program. Adequately prepared students will generally need four semesters of formal coursework leading to comprehensive exams and all students are expected to spend a minimum of two years in residence in College Park. The coursework part of the program is designed as a two-year full-time program. Students conduct their field research and write their dissertations away from campus. Throughout the PhD process, students work closely with a faculty mentor that specializes in a field matched with the student’s concentration.

 

What is the deadline for application?

The deadline for application to the PhD in Urban and Regional Planning and Design is January 15.

 

What kind of funding does the school provide?

The School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation anticipates approximately three research assistantships available to students in the PhD Program in Urban and Regional Planning and Design each year. In addition, the National Center for Smart Growth supports approximately three PhD Students each year. Students may also find financial support on faculty research projects and with teaching possibilities in our master’s programs. Compensation for assistantships includes tuition remission for up to 10 credit hours per semester, plus a stipend.

Technology Solutions Center (TSC)

Software Queries

How do I access and use TERPware (free software installations) from university?

Various software products are available for download and use by University of Maryland, College Park students, faculty, and staff due to agreements managed by the Division of IT between the university and software companies. Many are available for download at no cost through TERPware, the university's software download website. The list of software can be found on : https://terpware.umd.edu/
 

How do I obtain free software educational versions for my personal computer?

A number of companies like Autodesk, Trimble, Graphisoft and ESRI offer educational versions for their applications. The licensing period differs with programs.

  • For AutoCAD and REVIT:

     http://www.autodesk.com/education/free-software/featured

  • For ArchiCAD

     https://www.graphisoft.com/learning/education_gsna/teachers/

  • For Sketchup (Discounted Price/Not Free)

     https://www.sketchup.com/plans-and-pricing#for-higher-education

  • For Rhino (Discounted Price/Not Free)

     https://www.rhino3d.com/edu

  • For ArcGIS

     http://www.esri.com/landing-pages/software/arcgis/arcgis-desktop-student...



What do I need to check before printing?

Files larger than 100 MB will take a considerable amount of time to process on large format printers. Export your Photoshop/Illustrator/InDesign/AutoCAD/Revit file to a PDF file to save space and time. Remember to separate each page of your PDF to a single PDF file!

 

Printing Usage

Please refer to the “DOC Instructions Manual” booklet on how to use our large format plotters. It is also available on every lab computer desktop upon logged-in as well as laminated physical copy inside the printing room.

 

 

FAQ for New Students

How do I get access into the Architecture Building, computer labs and other related areas?

  • Building and lab access is given by the TSC- Technology Solution Center. You may email tsc@umd.edu with your name and UID # or you may visit us in our office which is right across the first floor computer lab in Architecture Building.

  • Access to Caroline Hall for GAs, TAs, and RAs is also given by TSC. Have your program director email us with your name and UID # for access.

  • Access to the Fab Lab (Laser Cutter) is also given by TSC only after the student has received training on how to use the laser cutter. Please email datwater@umd.edu to enroll for laser cutter training.

 

How do I connect with university Wi-Fi networks? 

Use the “eduroam” network. The University of Maryland has joined eduroam (education roaming), a secure, worldwide roaming internet access service developed for the international research and education community. This means that UMD students, faculty, and staff visiting member institutions abroad may use DirectoryID @umd.edu and Directory password to log into wireless at other member institutions.

 

 

FAQ for Faculty and Staff

How can University guests gain internet access?

Click here for details on how to gain internet access.

 

How can faculty, staff and student get onto the University Wi-Fi?

University personnel with valid DirectoryID and password can join the eduroam wireless network. Keep in mind that the username field is your entire @umd.edu email address.

 

 

Auditorium (0204) FAQ:

How do I  access/use AV in the auditorium?

The auditorium, Room 0204, is operated by the University’s Classroom Support Office (http://www.classrooms.umd.edu/). If you need help with anything involving classrooms, from technology malfunctions to problems with the physical environment (temperature, flooding, broken or missing furniture, etc.), the single point of contact is:

 

Classroom Support Office

Division of Information Technology
0125 Hornbake
Phone: (301) 405-2500
Email: classrooms@umd.edu

 

Office Hours:

Monday - Thursday: 7:30 am to 10:00 pm
Friday: 7:30 am to 6:00 pm

 

The TSC Provides the following support for 0204 Auditorium:

  • Daily support Monday-Friday from 7am -7pm. If you need support past daily hours, you must send mail to tsc@umd.edu one week prior to an event.

  • General instructional usage on opening/closing the chalkboard, controlling volume for speakers and mic, turning on/off projector, showing powerpoint presentations, playing a DVD, and using X-Panel software to control auditorium functionality

 

Semester-Long Classes in the Auditorium: 

I am teaching a class in 0204. How do I find out what software is on the machine? 0204 has the same software as every other technology classroom on campus.

That list can be found here: https://terpware.umd.edu/Windows/List/242.

 

Can I use a flashdrive with a Powerpoint presentation?

Yes.

 

Can I bring my laptop and plug it in to show a presentation?

Yes with appropriate adapter that support VGA connection.

 

What if something goes wrong with the sound, projection, or computer?

Call the technology classroom support # 52600, or 301-405-2600.

 

How do I schedule a class in 0204?

Contact your program director to request that your class meet in 0204.

 

Special Events in the Auditorium:

How do I schedule an event in 0204 – a lecture, symposium, guest speaker, etc? Contact your program representative to request for special event in 0204.

 

What if I want my event videotaped?

Contact the VRC, cfrank@umd.edu, 301-405-6321, or stop by the Architecture Library (Room 1102) to arrange to borrow the video cameras and tripods or arrange for a staff person to do the recording. This is completely dependent on staff availability. The VRC will also train you how to operate the video cameras.

 

Who do I contact for an additional podium, chairs, or table?

Contact the Facilities Management office https://www.facilities.umd.edu/. There will be a fee for additional items.

 

How far in advance should I schedule and plan for my event?

Ideally you plan a semester ahead of time.

 

What if I need additional support personnel or hardware such as microphones?  

Classroom Support: 301-405-2500.

 

How much does it cost to rent equipment?

We do not have an official pricing schedule available, but see the list below for some of the more common items requested. Keep in mind that the listed microphone equipment is for connection to an existing AV system in a room or lecture hall and is not a portable PA type system. We do not have a portable PA system available for rental at this time.

 

Tech labor for setup and/or event support       $40.00 per hour

Microphone mixer                                           $10.00 per day

Mic with desk or floor stand                           $5.00 per day

Wireless mic                                                  $20.00 per day (we only have one available)

Video projector                                               $30.00 per day

Portable Tripod screen                                   $20.00 per day

 

A few other item groups will need to be considered before contacting us for rentals.

We will need a KFS number and department contact person for billing before we will schedule any support. Our normal hours are from 7:00am to 7:00pm, Monday - Thursday and 7:00am to 5:00pm on Fridays. Microphone mixers have only four inputs. If more microphones are needed, a second mixer is required. If needed, we can make special arrangements for a trained student tech to be available for weekend event support at $20 per hour.

 

How do I set up a conference call with WebEx?

Click here for details on how to set up a conference call with WebEx. 

 

How do I install VPN to remote access on my campus computer and databases?

VPN (Virtual Private Networking) client is required to access UMD Internet resources or (if you use the UMD wireless network) when you want to encrypt your Internet communications. It is used when you are remotely accessed to your UMD campus computers or databases. 

The PDF below shows a step by step installation process.