Kiplin Hall Summer 2018

Education Abroad
May 22, 2018 to June 9, 2018
Summer 2018

HISP619Y: Understanding Place: Historic Cultural Landscapes of Yorkshire and Northeast England



The University of Maryland Program in Historic Preservation is again offering the opportunity to study abroad at our Study Centre located at Kiplin Hall in Yorkshire, England. Kiplin Hall was built ca. 1620 by George Calvert, founder of the Maryland colony, and has been meticulously preserved. It is open to the public as a house museum and historic landscape. 


Students in this course will have the opportunity to explore the complex nature of cultural landscapes first-hand and in depth. Using the extraordinarily rich historic resources of Yorkshire and Northeast England as a text, students will critically consider the different theories underlying the concepts of cultural landscapes and of landscape preservation, as well as gain experience in the methods of identifying, recording, preserving, and interpreting a range of landscape types: vernacular, designed, industrial, sectarian, urban, agrarian, military, and maritime.


The program will be based at the Maryland Study Centre at Kiplin Hall, the home of the interrelated Calvert-Crowe-Carpenter-Talbot families for more than 350 years, and which was built ca. 1620 by George Calvert, the founder of the Maryland colony.


Four days will be spent inventorying properties that formerly were part of the 5000-acre Kiplin estate. Students will interview property owners and experience recording historic structures and landscape features, assessing their condition and integrity, and making recommendations for their preservation. The remainder of the time will primarily be spent touring the surrounding region to explore a range of cultural landscape types. Students will have three free days to pursue their own interests.


The program is open to graduate students, and advanced undergraduate students (rising juniors and seniors), from any university or college, who may earn up six hours of academic credit.


Interested students should contact Professor Dennis J. Pogue, PhD at